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The New Inquiry Vol. 52: New Masses

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This is the editorial note to TNI Vol. 52: New Masses. View the full table of contents here.
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On the speed of unrest: “The public is a slow-moving riot,” writes philosopher Nina Power in “Thirty-One Theses on the Problem of the Public,” quoted in the chapter of Joshua Clover’s Riot. Strike. Riot that we excerpt in this issue. But this is also a way to explain the school-shooting epidemic, in New Yorker writer Malcolm Gladwell’s hands: “think of it as a slow-motion, ever-evolving riot.” As usual, the apologist of ruling-class ideology unwittingly expresses a facet of the truth. The public as we know it is a formal name for a long series of shooting sprees carried out by young white men, or, put another way: bourgeois society is war.

Within the theater of war are populations and zones marked as targets, and those who enjoy the protection of a sort of social camouflage. Riot. Strike. Riot concerns itself with the population “whose labor can never be objectified,” and therefore “whose modality is riot,” and whose unfolding is “not a demand but a civil war.” Clover notes that researchers from the Global Social Protest Research Group have found that the wave of uprisings since 2011are neither “Marx-type” or “Polanyi-type,” but a new form entirely: “Protest of the Stagnant Relative Surplus Population.”

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African Poetry Fictions

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Image| Jerry Riley | http://www.jerryrileyphotography.com

Keguro Macharia, “African Poetry: Introduction“:

The story of African poetry, if is to be told, will be the accumulation of very stories: very Somali, very Nigerian, very Egyptian, very South African, very Ugandan, very Burundian, and very each of the diverse regions in those geographies and geohistories.

Aaron Bady, “The Novelty of African Poetry“:

How would you talk about the development of African poetry without placing people like Kofi Awoonor and Gabriel Okara at the center of the story? And how could we imagine its future if we didn’t look to young poets like Clifton Gachagua, Ladan Osman, Mahtem Shiferraw, Mukoma wa Ngugi, and Patricia Jabbeh Wesley?

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Sunday Reading

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Kerim Friedman:

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Reclaim UC:

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Practically Marzipan:

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zunguzungu:

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Aljavieera:

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Sunday Reading

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Jacob Remes:

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Kitabet:

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Aljavieera:

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