Un(der)seen Cinema: Experiments in Terror

Outer Space by Peter Tscherkassky

Not a film but an incredibly curated series of avant-garde and experimental horror films, Experiments in Terror is a DVD compilation put together by Othercinema of weird and scary art films. It’s the kind of thing you used to pick up back when there were video stores, and you’d browse the horror section because you were twelve and you liked getting the shit scared out of you, and it had a weird and creepy cover, but then you’d bring it home and you’d be totally befuddled and terrified and have your mind blown by the weird art films.

Journey Into the Unknown by Kerry Laitala

Video stores provided that kind of thing, serendipitous encounters with the unknown, and no section was quite as good a producer of those experiences as horror, because of its wide range of quality, intensity and seriousness. Horror movies swing from the traumatically horrifying to the unbelievably hilarious. Usually shot on a shoestring, one encounters a lot of weird non-standard production methods and a huge range of camp and silliness. Horror films are vulgar, non-anesthetized, and often strange and experimental.

Tuning the Sleeping Machine by David Sherman

Horror makes a natural ally with film and video art. One of experimentation’s great strengths is its capacity to confuse, to alienate, to frighten and disorient. At a time when alienation, disorientation and fear seem to be the day to day currency of the social, it can be helpful to remember and recognize that adventure contains those capacities within it as well.

The Virgin Sacrifice by J.X. Williams

Temple of Womb

India’s mid-1970s state of emergency and its ghoulish “family planning camps” inadvertently spawned a particular kind of horror film, and the underground infrastructure to match